Achillea millefolium

Archillea millefolium

Common Names: Achi Uea, Achilles Wort, Achilles Herb, Arrowroot, Bad Man’s Plaything, Carpenter’s weed, Death Flower, Devil’s Nettle, Eerie, Field ops, Gearwe, Green Arrow, Herba Muilitaris, Hundred Leaved Grass, Knights Milfoil, Knyten, Milfoil, Militaris, Military Herb, Millefolium, Noble Yarrow, Nosebleed, Old Man’s Mustard, Old Man’s Pepper, Sanguinary, Seven Year’s Love, Squirrel Tail, Snake Grass, Soldier’s Woundwort, Stanch Grass, Stanch Griss, Stanch Weed, Tansy, Thousand seal, Wound Wort, Yaroway, Yerw

Astrological: Primary: Libra, Taurus, Cancer, Secondary, Pisces and Scorpio

Associated Deities: Heru-Wer (Horus the Elder), Eros, Eleggua, Sekhmet, Obatala, Oshun

Medicinal: Antihemorrahagic, Antiperiodic, Antispasmodic, Astringent, Carminative, Diaphoretic, Febrifuge, Nervine, Stimulant (aromatic), Tonic, Vulnerary

Parts Used: Flowers, young leaves, Secondary leaves, root, (stalks for divining sticks – China) Best gathered in August when in full bloom.

Yarrow has been used since antiquity for the healing of wounds. Wounds that are deep, even cuts to the bone are benefited by Yarrow. Yarrow offers also mild relief from pain including headaches. It works to the third level of cuts and wounds, and addresses the fevers associated with cuts and deeper wounds. A fellow herbalist once told a class the tale of someone who had actually wounded themselves with a chainsaw. A tincture of Achillea millefolium was poured directly on the wound and bandaged. By morning, the wound had started to fuse together and by the second day, there was a thin pinkish line where the wound had been. It is without a doubt a wound dressing extraordinaire and should be in the cabinet of every competent herbalist and witch.

Yarrow it is said is dedicated to the “Evil One”, hence some of the names such as Devil’s Nettle, Devil’s Plaything, Bad Man’s Plaything. Yarrow was used for divination in spells and the stalks used in Divination sticks for the I Ching in China. In the Highlands of Scotland there is an ointment that is made from fresh herb. This is good for piles, and is also used against the scab in sheep. Fresh leaves are used to help stop toothache.

Yarrow has been used as the basis for a beer and is found to be more intoxicating than that which is made with hops.

Magickal Uses: Yarrow can be used in a magical bag or sachet as well as incense to bring courage. It is excellent in bringing back long lost family and friends. Infusions of Yarrow can be sued to banish all sorts of malevolent spirits from both person and home. It is used as a scent in essential oils to enhance friendships and mutual respect between people. Yarrow encourages intuition in all of its forms and helps instill common sense and good negotiations on all sides.


Resources:
Beyerl, Paul V. “Master Book of Herbalism”
Grieve, Maud A. A Modern Herbal, Dover Publications
Wood, Matthew, “The Book of Herbal Wisdom: Using Plants as Medicines”, 1997, North Atlantic Books
And this Wytch’s own considerable notes and experiences about this herb.

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